Parnassus


Mount Parnassus is named after Parnassos, the son of the nymph Kleodora and the man Kleopompus. A city, of which Parnassos was leader, was flooded by torrential rains. The citizens ran from the flood, following wolves’ howling, up the mountain slope. There the survivors built another city, and called it Lykoreia, which in Greek means ‘the howling of the wolves’.

English: Mount Parnassus, Greece.

Mount Parnassus, Greece

While Orpheus was living with his mother and his eight beautiful aunts on Parnassus, he met Apollo who was courting the laughing muse Thalia. Apollo became fond of Orpheus and gave him a little golden lyre, and taught him to play it. Orpheus’s mother taught him to make verses for singing. As the Oracle of Delphi was sacred to the god Apollo, so did the mountain itself become associated with Apollo.

According to some traditions, Parnassus was the site of the fountain Castalia and the home of the Muses; according to other traditions, that honour fell to Mount Helicon, another mountain in the same range. As the home of the Muses, Parnassus became known as the home of poetry, music, and learning.

Parnassus was also the home of Pegasus, the winged horse of Bellerophon.

Deuteronomy 22:28-29


28 If a man happens to meet a virgin who is not pledged to be married and rapes her and they are discovered,

29 he shall pay the girl’s father fifty shekels of silver. He must marry the girl, for he has violated her. He can never divorce her as long as he lives.

See other: Often Ignored Bible Verses

António de Oliveira Salazar


António de Oliveira Salazar (28 April 1889 – 27 July 1970) served as the Prime Minister of Portugal from 1932 to 1968. He also served as acting President of the Republic briefly in 1951.

Português: Antonio de Oliveira Salazar

António de Oliveira Salazar

He founded and led the Estado Novo ‘New State’, the authoritarian, right-wing government that presided over and controlled Portugal from 1932 to 1974.

The Estado Novo has been described as a far-right leaning regime of para-fascist inspiration. He never declared his government as officially fascist, but he did give three days national morning after Adolf Hitler died.

As de jure dictator of Portugal, he suffered a stroke in 1968. He was replaced as ruler, but was never told. Ironically, he went to the grave thinking that he was still ruling the country.

See other: Admin’s Choice Posts

Knismesis and Gargalesis


Knismesis and gargalesis are the scientific terms, coined in 1897 by psychologists G. Stanley Hall and Arthur Allin, used to describe the two types of tickling.

Feather 001

A feather, often used for tickling

Knismesis refers to the light, feather-like type of tickling. This type of tickling generally does not induce laughter and is often accompanied by an itching sensation. The knismesis phenomenon requires low levels of stimulation to sensitive parts of the body, and can be triggered by a light touch or by a light electrical current. Knismesis can also be triggered by crawling insects or parasites, prompting scratching or rubbing at the ticklish spot, thereby removing the pest. It is possible that this function explains why knismesis produces a similar response in many different kinds of animals.

Gargalesis refers to harder, laughter-inducing tickling, and involves the repeated application of high pressure to sensitive areas. This so-called heavy tickle is often associated with play and laughter. The gargalesis type of tickle works on humans and primates, and possibly on other species. Because the nerves involved in transmitting light touch and itch differ from those nerves that transmit heavy touch, pressure and vibration, it is possible that the difference in sensations produced by the two types of tickle are due to the relative proportion of itch sensation versus touch sensation.

While it is possible to trigger a knismesis response in oneself, it is usually impossible to produce gargalesthesia, the gargalesis tickle response, in oneself.

The condition of extreme sensitivity to tickling is called Hypergargalesthesia.

15/ii mmxii


The Romans believed that buggery caused earthquakes.

Giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), Cope...

The Myrmecophaga Tridactyla or Giant anteater

Anteaters have sixteen-inch tongues, but mouths as narrow as a pencil.

The average graphite pencil can write for thirty-five miles.

Dwarf anteaters are the size of squirrels and are a delicacy in parts of South America.

Young giant anteaters indulge in so-called “bluff charging”. Their claws are sharp enough to eviscerate (disembowel) a human.

See other: Quite Interesting Facts

Pillars of Hercules


The Columnae Herculis was the phrase that was applied in Antiquity to the promontories that flank the entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar. The northern Pillar is the Rock of Gibraltar in the British overseas territory of Gibraltar. A corresponding North African peak not being predominant, the identity of the southern Pillar has been disputed through history, with the two most likely candidates being Monte Hacho in Ceuta and Jebel Musa in Morocco.

English: Detail of Pillars of Hercules from Ta...

Location of the Pillars of Hercules in the Gibraltar Strait

According to Greek mythology adopted by the Etruscans and Romans, when Hercules had to perform twelve labours, one of them was to fetch the Cattle of Geryon of the far West and bring them to Eurystheus; this marked the westward extent of his travels. A lost passage of Pindar quoted by Strabo was the earliest traceable reference in this context: ‘The pillars which Pindar calls the gates of Gades when he asserts that they are the farthermost limits reached by Heracles.’

According to Plato’s account, the lost realm of Atlantis was situated beyond the Pillars of Hercules, in effect placing it in the realm of the Unknown. Renaissance tradition says the pillars bore the warning Nec plus ultra – or Non plus ultra: ‘nothing further beyond’ – serving as a warning to sailors and navigators to go no further.

According to some Roman sources, while on his way to the island of Erytheia Hercules had to cross the mountain that was once Atlas. Instead of climbing the great mountain, Hercules used his superhuman strength to smash through it. By doing so, he connected the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and formed the Strait of Gibraltar. One part of the split mountain is Gibraltar and the other is either Monte Hacho or Jebel Musa. These two mountains taken together have since then been known as the Pillars of Hercules, though other natural features have been associated with the name. Diodorus Siculus, however, held that instead of smashing through an isthmus to create the Straits of Gibraltar, Hercules instead narrowed an already existing strait to prevent monsters from the Atlantic Ocean from entering the Mediterranean Sea.

Español: Escudo de España (variante con las Co...

Escudo de España; the Spanish of Coat of Arms

The Pillars appear as supporters of the coat of arms of Spain, originating from the famous impresa – royal emblem, or badge – of the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V, who was King of Spain in the years following the discovery of the Americas. It bears the motto Plus Ultra, encouraging him to ignore the ancient warning, to take risks and go further beyond. It indicates the desire to see the Pillars as an entrance to the rest of the world rather than as a gate to the Mediterranean Sea. It also indicates the overseas possessions that Spain had.

Also, in Inferno XXVI Dante Alighieri mentions Ulysses in the pit of the Fraudulent Counsellors and his voyage past the Pillars of Hercules. Ulysses justifies endangering his sailors by the fact that his goal is to gain knowledge of the unknown. After five months of navigation in the ocean, Ulysses sights the mountain of Purgatory but encounters a whirlwind from it that sinks his ship and all on it for their daring to approach Purgatory while alive, by their strength and wits alone.