Odd Words (i)


Old English
dūstscēawung (f.) [noun.]

  • viewing or contemplation of dust.

Emilian
mustadûra [noun.]

  • the act of treading on grapes.

Spanish
desengaño (m.) [noun.]

  • realization of the truth, especially after a period of deceit.

Quechua
maywaq [noun.]

  • he who caresses.

Tongan
huhu [noun.]

  • breast; breasts; teat;
  • fork.

Tahitian
mania [adjective.]

  • (of the sea or weather) calm;
  • (figuratively) serene, tranquil, peaceful (state of mind).

Quechua
allpayay [verb.]

  • to become soil.

Swedish
hen [pronoun.]

  • (neologism) a personal pronoun of unspecified gender; an alternative to “hon” (she) or “han” (he).

German
Tante-Emma-Laden (m.) [noun.]

  • mom-and-pop grocery store, mom-and-pop convenience store.

Russian
шпионома́ния (špionománija) (f.) [noun.]

  • spy mania, spy fever (paranoia about spies, fearmongering about the threat of foreign spies).

Old Norse
hundrað (n.) [noun.]

  • a long hundred (120).

Finnish
rupsahtaa [verb.]

  • to lose one’s beauty or handsomeness, especially regarding the shape and firmness of body.

Catalan
esgatinyar-se [verb.]

  • to fight mutually using scratches, in the manner of cats;
  • (figuratively) to have a catfight.

Swedish
pekoral (f.) [noun.]

  • a text written in a grandiloquent or pompous style but lacking literary quality, thus making it seem overly pretentious or ridiculous.

Latin
arborēscō [verb.]

  • I become a tree.

Tok Pisin
long [preposition.]

  • used to mark spatial direct objects that something is oriented in the manner of, where English would use to, toward, into, or onto;
  • used to mark spatial direct objects that something is oriented in the location of, where English would use in, at, on, or near;
  • used to mark indirect objects, or direct objects of intransitive verbs, where English would use to;
  • used to mark spatial direct objects that something is oriented in the manner opposite of, extracted from, or away from, where English would use from or out of.

See other: Odd Words

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