Solipsism‏


Solipsism, in philosophy, is an extreme form of subjective idealism that denies that the human mind has any valid ground for believing in the existence of anything but itself. It is the theory that ‘the self’ is all that exists or that can be proven to exist.

“I am my world.” – Ludwig Wittgenstein

Presented as a solution of the problem of explaining human knowledge of the external world, it is generally regarded as a reductio ad absurdum (the method of proving a statement by assuming the statement is false and, with that assumption, arriving at a blatant contradiction).

More colloquially, solipsism is defined as self-absorption, an unawareness of the views or needs of others: the quality of being self-centred or selfish.

“But what can a decent man speak of with most pleasure? Answer: Of himself. Well, so I will talk about myself.” – Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground

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The fathers of Christopher Marlowe (1564-93), Joseph Stalin (1879-1953), Hans Christian Andersen (1805-75) and Louis Braille (1809-1852) were all cobblers.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The fathers of Andrew Jackson, 7th President of the USA; Rutherford B Hayes, 19th President of the USA; and Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the USA, all died before their sons were born.

The Shuka Saptati, written originally in Sanskrit, is a collection of seventy erotic tales narrated by a parrot to prevent its mistress from committing adultery while her husband is away from home.

Fyodor Dostoevsky’s father was murdered by his own serfs, who poured vodka down his throat until he drowned in it.

In the course of a year, the average Tanzanian peasant family carries 90 ton per kilometre (56 ton-miles) of stuff on its collective heads.

See other: Quite Interesting Facts