Do ‘it’ for Denmark


Kan sex redde Danmarks fremtid? That is, can sex save Denmark’s future?

According to government statistics, Denmark posted a birth rate of 10 per 1,000 residents in 2013 — its lowest in decades. The nation’s birthrate was  9.9 in 1983.

Denmark’s perennially low birth rate places it with Germany (8.33), Japan (8.39) and Singapore (7.72). And the downward trend has left people worried in Denmark. Most couples say they want two or three kids, according to the Copenhagen Post, but one in five couples wind up childless.

To counter this trend, a bold and hilarious campaign has emerged. For the salvation of the country, a Danish travel company called Spies has organized the movement Do it for Denmark!; it wants Danes to act and act now — without precautions.

“This is Denmark. We are Danes. We keep our distance. We do not pick a seat close to strangers if other seats are available. We do not talk to strangers in the trains.”
― Steen Langstrup, Metro

Studies show that Danes have 46 percent more sex on holiday, and because more sex increases the chances for more children, the travel company Spies has called for a romantic break to save the future of Denmark.

To get the campaign of the ground, Spies will give prizes to couples who get pregnant while on vacations purchased through them.

Afterwards, upon successful sex, the couple is to shoot off a positive pregnancy test and medical records to the company. Then they may win three years worth of free diapers.

Börn er vis sorg, men uvis gläede.
― Children are definitive sorrow, but undefinitive joy.

And just in case Danes are confused by this whole pregnancy thing, the company has offered a helpful how-to on its website:

  • Men, avoid tight pants. Even if you think they look good on you.
  • Remember to exercise and maintain a healthy body weight.
  • Avoid stress. Take a massage or try some yoga.
  • Use Gravity. Lay down after sex for at least 15 minutes.
  • Don’t forget to have sex – without using protection.

Freetown Christiania


The famous Danish Freetown Christiania was founded in 1971 when a group of hippies took over abandoned military barracks and their surrounding along the Copenhagen Christianshavn canals, and developed it to an alternative society with own set of rules, independent of the government. This social experiment that included collective ownership has over the years developed and established its semi-legal status. Today the enclave’s user rights have been terminated by Danish state.

One of the main streets in Christiania, Copenhagen

One of the main streets of Christiania

After the military moved out, the area was only guarded by a few watchmen and there was sporadic trespassing of homeless people using the empty buildings. On September 4th 1971, inhabitants of the surrounding neighbourhood broke down the fence to take over parts of the unused area as a playground for their children.

Although the takeover was not necessarily organised in the beginning, some claim this happened as a protest against the Danish government. At the time there was a lack of affordable housing in Copenhagen.

On the 26th of September 1971, Christiania was declared open by Jacob Ludvigsen, a well-known provo (a Dutch counterculture movement in the mid-1960s that focused on provoking violent responses from authorities using non-violent bait) and journalist. Ludvigsen wrote an article in which he and five others went on exploration into what he termed: ‘The Forbidden City of the Military’. The article widely announced the proclamation of the free town. In 1971, Ludvigsen co-authored the Christiania’s mission statement:

“The objective of Christiania is to create a self-governing society whereby each and every individual holds themselves responsible over the wellbeing of the entire community. Our society is to be economically self-sustaining and, as such, our aspiration is to be steadfast in our conviction that psychological and physical destitution can be averted.”

The spirit of Christiania quickly developed into one of the hippie movement, the squatter movement, collectivism and anarchism, in contrast to the site’s previous military use.

Flag of Christiania

Flag of Christiania

Today, the commune is partially self-governing, and its members pay taxes to the state, but it still applies own rules such as: no cars, no stealing, no guns, no bullet-proof vests, no hard drugs. The stands on the infamous Pusher Street, where until 2004 one could buy hash openly at, are gone today, but the cameras are still not allowed here. On top of that, the ban on smoking in public spaces is not respected here.

Christiania has its own flag, and even its own currency; the Løn.

The approximately 850 citizens of Christiania work as artisans. Also, the famous Christiania Bikes are produced here. The inhabitants drive also meditation centra, cafés, restaurants, and a couple of music night clubs. Many houses that were built, painted and decorated by their first inhabitants, became historical objects.

Christiania is unique; one of its kind in the world, and for many people became a symbol of Danish liberal lifestyle. The Town can only be entered through its two main entrances.

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