On A New Language


“With each newly learned language you acquire a new soul.”

– Slovakian proverb

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Greek Proverbs


Κόρακας κοράκου μάτι δε βγάζει

“The crow does not take the eye out of another crow.”

  • Meaning: People who are the same do not hurt each other.
  • English equivalent: Hawks will not pick out Hawk’s eyes.
  • Shqiptaro-Greke (1999). Albanohellenica. Albanian-Greek Philological Association. p. 22.

Η γλώσσα κόκαλα δεν έχει, αλλά κόκαλα τσακίζει.

“The tongue has no bones, yet it crushes bones.”

  • English equivalent: The pen is mightier than the sword.
  • Venizelos (1867). Paroimiai dēmōdeis. Ek tou typographeiou tēs “Patridos”. p. 95.

Καλή ζωή, κακή διαθήκη

“Good life, bad testament.”

  • Implying that most likely, you will leave little in your will by living a good life.
  • Chakkas (1978). Hapanta. Kedros.

Ο πνιγμένος, από τα μαλλιά του πιάνεται

“The drowning man grips to his own hair.”‘

  • Meaning: A person in a desperate situation will try the most desperate measures.
  • English equivalent: A drowning man will clutch at a straw.
  • Κριαρας (2007). Αλλελωγραφιαδυο:. ΕκδοσειςΠολυτυπο. p. 33.

More Than A Means Of Communication


“Language is my mother, my father, my husband, my brother, my sister, my whore, my mistress, my checkout-girl. Language is a complementary moist lemon-scented cleansing squire or handy freshen up towelette. Language is the breath of God. Language is the dew on a fresh apple. It’s the soft rain of dust that falls over a shaft of morning light as you pluck from an old bookshelf; a half forgotten book of erotic memoires. Language is the creak on a stair. It’s a spluttering match held to a frosted pain. It’s a half remembered childhood birthday party. It’s the warm wet trusting touch of a leaking nappy, the hulk of a charred panzer, the underside of a granite bolder, the first downy growth on the upper lip of a Mediterranean girl. It’s cobwebs long since overrun by an old Wellington boot.”

– Stephen Fry